23 January 2008

Google Transit: Knee-Shakingly Tight

Wow. Just when I thought my love for Google was maxed out, they go and do something awesome. And I'm always the last to know. The roll-out all their nifty updates and web apps without much fuss and then suddenly, it's everywhere.

This time? Google Transit: directions via public transit on Google Maps. Hot-Cha. Unlike their Street View option, Google Transit has integrated the public transit systems of a significant number of cities, including a few international spots.

So, wanna go from 4412 Northeast 17th Avenue to West Burnside Street & Southwest Broadway in Portland, Oregon? That's a two minute walk northeast then hop on the 8 bus at 5:10pm. Oh, and that'll cost you $1.75 (vs $1.65 driving). That's right: they calculate fare AND estimated cost of driving.

And Virginia's even in there. Good job, Hampton Roads!

6 comments:

The Becca said...

Holy shit. That's amazing. I heart Google.

Matthew said...

Our dig design prof said last spring that the race is on bw microsoft live and google earth to create virtual markets. in other words, create a simulation of the actual street, put up online links to visual renderings of the stores, and let you "shop" or just, you know, be bombarded with ads. just like real life! only without the sex.

The Becca said...

microsoft sucks.

Orville said...

While google remains tight-supreme, Hampton Roads Transit needs to tighten up. The nearly two hour public transit odyssey between First Landing State Park and St. Paul's Blvd. downtown is maybe, MAYBE, a twenty-five minute drive.

Bodenner said...

similarly tight: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/metro/interactives/taxifares/

mandy said...

Actually, I know nothing of Hampton Roads, so I literally just picked two things and connected them; it's probably me who needs to tighten-up for being so willy-nilly.

Microsoft does suck, but I like this virtual market idea. If their presence produces massive output from competitors, let the games begin!

Oh, and for anyone in DC or NYC who can actually use this service, let us know how well it works. I love the idea, but I wonder how far it flies in application. I imagine it could be killer with an iPhone, but I wouldn't know.